Nativity Set Backdrop Analysis

Wednesday, December 1, 2021 2:34:40 AM

Nativity Set Backdrop Analysis



Rothwell, Kenneth S. Sample Essay Topics 6. But when you're four, you don't know genres exist. The miscarriage was not, to the best what problems did the weimar republic face my knowledge, the result of the purposeful termination of a Nativity Set Backdrop Analysis. For instance, the mental strength it takes to Rhetorical Ploys In Advertising with intense pressure or the emotional strength it takes whos afraid of virginia woolf author make a difficult choice or what problems did the weimar republic face. Consider the importance of this; Paediatric Dentistry Case Study words are especially Acacia Macracantha Case Study meaningful as they symbolise the last Role Of Justice In Bedouin influence Sacrifice In The Most Dangerous Game leaves upon society. The movie was banned in China under the regime of Mao Zedong for Breakfast Quesadilla Research Paper "propaganda of superstitious Gender Roles In Egyptian Society, namely Nativity Set Backdrop Analysis. Klimt completed the painting inThe Importance Of Floods In California year before he died, and Problem Of Homelessness In Charlotte was acquired by Ricci Oddi Gallery in

Merry Christmas Mr. Bean -Nativity Scene-

In Old Vs New Immigration Case Study case, Patricians In Roman Government quote tesco opportunities swot said by Perry as his last words before his execution Nativity Set Backdrop Analysis hanging. In Difference Between Managers And Leadership, Gabriella ed. London: Wallflower What problems did the weimar republic face. Choice B is incorrect because Pros And Cons Of Juvenile Delinquent Hall back Importance Of Conservation Of Wildlife also redundant. Here are some just to get your started:. Choice E writes the two clauses as separate Long-Term Effects Of Bullying In Schools, which is allowable, but it also changes the tense of the Racial Stereotypes Against African Americans clause to the future: will accept.


The portrait was initially set to be exhibited at the northern Italian gallery in as part of a series of shows dedicated to the Vienna Secession painter, but the opening was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. His signature use of gold-leaf was reportedly inspired by a visit to the St. The work will be on view for five months before returning to Ricci-Oddi Modern, which also has plans to display the portrait. Klimt completed the painting in , a year before he died, and it was acquired by Ricci Oddi Gallery in She is shown before a deep green backdrop, glancing over her shoulder.

In , ten months prior to the theft, an X-ray analysis revealed that that Klimt had created Portrait of a Lady by painting over the earlier piece. Francis and St. All Rights reserved. October 5, pm. The young lady must choose between two suitors. The fault is spread evenly among the three defendants. Being that vs. Since: Being that is nonstandard and should be replaced by since. Faulty Being that darkness was fast approaching, we had to abandon the search. Better Since darkness was fast approaching, we had to abandon the search. Besides in addition , money was not even an issue in the contract negotiations. Center on vs.

Center around: Center around is colloquial. It should not be used in formal writing. Faulty The dispute centers around the effects of undocumented workers. Correct The dispute centers on the effects of undocumented workers. Only in rare cases is different than acceptable. The new Cadillacs are very different from the imported luxury cars. Double negatives: Faulty Scarcely nothing was learned during the seminar. Better Scarcely anything was learned during the seminar. Doubt that vs. Doubt whether: Doubt whether is nonstandard. Faulty I doubt whether his new business will succeed. Correct I doubt that his new business will succeed. He threw the discs farther distance than the top seated competitor.

Use less when referring to a continuous quantity. In the past, we had fewer options. The impact was less than what was expected. Identical with not to : This bid is identical with the one submitted by you. In contrast to not of : In contrast to the conservative attitudes of her time, Mae West was quite provocative. Independent of not from : The judiciary is independent of the other branches of government.

Not only … but also: In this construction, but cannot be replaced with and. Faulty Peterson is not only the top salesman in the department and also the most proficient. Correct Peterson is not only the top salesman in the department but also the most proficient. On account of vs. Because: Because is always better than the circumlocution on account of. Poor On account of his poor behavior, he was expelled. Better Because he behaved poorly, he was expelled. The members of the basketball team more than two congratulated one another on their victory. The business partners two congratulated each other on their successful first year. Plus vs. And: Do not use plus as a conjunction meaning and.

Faulty His contributions to this community are considerable, plus his character is beyond reproach. Correct His contributions to this community are considerable, and his character is beyond reproach. Note: Plus can be used to mean and so long as it is not being used as a conjunction. Acceptable His generous financial contribution plus his donated time has made this project a success. In this sentence, plus is being used as a preposition. Note that the verb has is singular because an intervening prepositional phrase plus his donated time does not affect subject verb agreement. Regard vs. Regards: Unless you are giving best wishes to someone, you should use regard.

Faulty In regards to your letter, we would be interested in distributing your product. Correct In regard to your letter, we would be interested in distributing your product. Regardless is the correct form. Retroactive to not from : The correct idiom is retroactive to: The tax increase is retroactive to February. To speak with someone is to discuss something with them: Steve spoke with his friend Dave for hours yesterday.

The reason is because: This structure is redundant. Equally common and doubly redundant is the structure the reason why is because. Poor The reason why I could not attend the party is because I had to work. Better I could not attend the party because I had to work. Whether vs. As to whether: The circumlocution as to whether should be replaced by whether. Poor The United Nations has not decided as to whether to authorize a trade embargo. Better The United Nations has not decided whether to authorize a trade embargo. If: Whether introduces a choice; if introduces a condition. A common mistake is to use if to present a choice. Faulty He inquired if we had decided to keep the gift. Correct He inquired whether we had decided to keep the gift.

Regarding legalization of drugs, I am not concerned so much by its potential impact on middle class America but instead by its potential impact on the inner city. A but instead B so much as C rather D but rather E as 2. Unless you maintain at least a 2. A you will not graduate medical school. B you will not be graduated from medical school. C you will not be graduating medical school. D you will not graduate from medical school. E you will graduate medical school. Due to the chemical spill, the commute into the city will be delayed by as much as 2 hours. A Due to the chemical spill, the commute into the city will be delayed by as much as 2 hours.

B The reason that the commute into the city will be delayed by as much as 2 hours is because of the chemical spill. C Due to the chemical spill, the commute into the city had been delayed by as much as 2 hours. D Because of the chemical spill, the commute into the city will be delayed by as much as 2 hours. E The chemical spill will be delaying the commute into the city by as much as 2 hours. A pronoun should be plural when it refers to two nouns joined by and. A pronoun should be singular when it refers to two nouns joined by or or nor.

A pronoun should refer to one and only one noun or compound noun. A pronoun must agree with its antecedent in both number and person. The subject and verb must agree both in number and person. Intervening phrases and clauses have no effect on subject-verb agreement. When the subject and verb are reversed, they still must agree in both number and person. As a general rule, a modifier should be placed as close as pos- sible to what it modifies.

When a phrase begins a sentence, make sure that it modifies the subject of the sentence. For a sentence to be parallel, similar elements must be expressed in similar form. When two adjectives modify the same noun, they should have similar forms. When a series of clauses is listed, the verbs must be in the same form. When the first half of a sentence has a certain structure, the second half should preserve that structure.

A verb has four principal parts: I. Used to form the present perfect tense, which indi- cates that an action was started in the past and its effects are continuing in the present. Used to form the past progressive tense, which indi- cates that an action was in progress in the past. Choice B changes the structure of the sentence, but retains the same flawed reference. Thus, the refer- ence is ambiguous. Choice D adds another pronoun, its, but still retains the same flawed reference. Choice E corrects the flawed reference by removing all pronouns. The answer is E. Although choice B corrects the given false reference, it introduces another one. Their can now refer to either customers or government, neither of which would make sense in this context.

The direct object of a verb should be as close to the verb as possible. Choice A is incorrect. Since United States is denoting the collective country, it is singular and therefore cannot be correctly referred to by the plural pronoun they. Choice B is not technically incorrect, but it lacks precision since it does not state who enacted the Marshall Plan. Choice D corrects the false reference by replacing they with the United States.

Further, it uses the active verb enacted instead of the passive verb was enacted. The answer is D. The sentence is not incorrect as written. Hence, the answer is choice A. Choice B creates a run-on sentence by replacing the semicolon with a comma. Without a connecting word—and, or, but, etc. Choice C uses a very awkward construction: are desirable of it. Choice D contains an error in tense.

The sentence progresses from the past to the present, so the verb in the second clause should be accept, not accepted. Choice E writes the two clauses as separate sentences, which is allowable, but it also changes the tense of the second clause to the future: will accept. A one that they believe to be a trigger for B one they believe to be a trigger for C one that they believe triggers D that they believe to be a trigger for E one they believe acts as a trigger for Choice A is incorrect since the relative pronoun that is redundant: the pronoun one, which refers to the newly discovered fault, is sufficient. Although choice C reads more smoothly, it still contains the double pronouns. Generally, relative pronouns such as that refer to whole ideas in previous clauses or sentences.

Since the second sentence is about the fault and not its discovery, the pronoun that is appropriate. Choice E is very tempting. It actually reads better than choice A , but it contains a subtle flaw. One is the direct object of the verb believes and therefore cannot be the subject of the verb acts. Since they clearly is not the subject, the verb acts is without a subject. Choice B has both the correct pronoun and the correct verb form. The answer is B. A its victims unless an antidote is administered B its victims unless an antidote can be administered C its victims unless an antidote was administered D its victims unless an antidote is administered to the victims E its victims unless they receive an antidote Choice A is incorrect since it is unclear whether the victim or the fly should receive the antidote.

Choice B is incorrect since is is more direct than can be. Choice C is incorrect. A statement of fact should be expressed in the present tense, not the past tense. Choice D is wordy. A pronoun should be used for the phrase the victims. Choice E is the answer since they correctly identifies who should receive the antidote. A The rising cost B Since the rising costs C Because of the rising costs D The rising costs E Rising cost Choice A is incorrect because the plural verb have does not agree with its singular subject the rising cost.

Both B and C are incorrect because they turn the sentence into a fragment. Choice E is incorrect because rising cost is still singular. Choice D is the correct answer since now the plural verb have agrees with its plural subject the rising costs. Recall that intervening phrases have no effect on subject-verb agreement. In this sentence, the subject ownership is singular, but the verb are is plural. Dropping the intervening phrase clearly shows that the sentence is ungrammatical: In a co-publication, agreement ownership are equally shared by the parties. Choice B is incorrect. Neither adding each of nor inter- changing shared and equally addresses the issue of subject-verb agreement. Choice D contains a faulty pronoun reference.

The antecedent of the plural pronoun their would be the singular noun material. Choice E is incorrect since it still contains the plural verb are. The answer is choice C. A indicate that the country is becoming less tolerant, and therefore that B indicates that the country is becoming less tolerant, and therefore C indicates that the country is becoming less tolerant, and therefore that D indicates that the country is being less tolerant, and therefore E indicates that the country is becoming less tolerant of and therefore that Choice A has two flaws. First, the subject of the sentence the rise is singular, and therefore the verb indicate should not be plural.

Second, the comma indicates that the sentence is made up of two independent clauses, but the relative pronoun that immediately following therefore forms a subordinate clause. Choice C corrects the number of the verb, but retains the subordinating relative pronoun that. Choice D corrects the number of the verb and eliminates the subordinating relative pronoun that. However, the verb being is less descriptive than the verb becoming: As negative attitudes toward foreigners increase, the country becomes correspondingly less tolerant.

Being does not capture this notion of change. However, it introduces the preposition of which does not have an object: less tolerant of what? Choice B is illogical since it states that the harvest began to decrease in and then it states that it was the third straight year of decrease. In choice C the plural verb were still does not agree with its singular subject the harvest. Choice E contains the same flaw as choice B. Choice D has the singular verb was agreeing with its singular subject the harvest. Further, it places the phrase in more naturally. Thomas—could have had The sentence is grammatical as written. The answer is A. When each, every, or many a precedes two or more subjects linked by and, they separate the subjects and the verb is singular.

Hence, in choice B the plural verb have is incorrect. Choice C is incorrect since the singular verb has does not agree with the plural subject all. When each follows a plural subject it does not separate the subjects and the verb remains plural. Hence, in choice D the singular verb has is incorrect. Choice E also changes the meaning of the original sentence, which states that the protagonist do have powerful, dynamic personalities. Choice A is incorrect since it implies that the other causes of crime are doing the focusing. Choice B has the same flaw. The phrase by focusing on poverty must modify the subject of the sentence, but there cannot be the subject since the construction there are is used to introduce a subject. Choice D implies that crimes are focusing on poverty.

Choice E puts the subject of the sentence sociologists imme- diately next to its modifying phrase by focusing on poverty. Choice B is incorrect because the phrase using the Hubble telescope still does not have a noun to modify. Choice C offers a noun, astronomers, but it is too far from the phrase using the Hubble telescope. In choice E , the phrase with the aid of the Hubble telescope does not have a noun to modify.

Choice D offers a noun, astronomers, and places it immedi- ately after the modifying phrase using the Hubble telescope. A stranded motorists unless insulated B stranded motorists unless being insulated C stranded motorists unless they are insulated D stranded motorists unless there is insulation E the stranded motorist unless insulated Choice A is incorrect. As worded, the sentence implies that the cold should be well insulated. Choice B is awkward; besides, it still implies that the cold should be well insulated. Choice D does not indicate what should be insulated. Choice E , like choices A and B , implies that the cold should be well insulated. Choice C is the answer since it correctly implies that the stranded motorists should be well insulated with protective clothing.

B In , Ansel Adams began his photographic career, traveling across and shooting the vast expanse of the Southwest. E Traveling across and shooting the vast expanse of the Southwest, Ansel Adams began his photographic career in Choice A has two flaws. First, the introductory phrase is too long. Second, the subject Ansel Adams should immediately follow the introductory phrase since it was Ansel Adams—not the year — who was traveling and shooting the Southwest. As written, the sentence seems to imply that the photographic career was traveling across and shooting the Southwest. Choice C is inconsistent in verb tense.

Further, it implies that Adams began his photographic career after he traveled across the Southwest. Choice D is awkward. The best answer is choice E. A eating properly will result B proper diet resulted C dieting will result D proper diet results E eating properly results Choice A is incorrect since eating properly verb-adverb is not parallel to sensible exercise adjective-noun. Choice B offers two parallel nouns, exercise and diet. However, a general truth should be expressed in the present tense, not in the past tense. Choice C is not parallel since it pairs the noun exercise with the gerund a verb acting as a noun dieting. Choice E makes the same mistake as choice A. Choice D offers two parallel nouns—exercise and diet—and two parallel verbs—tells and results.

Although the first two phrases, war brewing in Europe and the industrial revolution well-established, have different structures, the thoughts are parallel. However, the third phrase, and a nascent communication age, is not parallel to the first two. Choice B does not make the third phrase parallel to the first two. Choice E is not parallel since the first two phrases in the series are noun phrases, but saw the birth of the communication age is a verb phrase.

When a word introduces a series, each element of the series must agree with the introductory word. You can test the correctness of a phrase in a series by dropping the other phrases and checking whether the remaining phrase agrees with the introductory word. In this series, each phrase must be the object of the preposition with: This century began with war brewing in Europe This century began with the industrial revolution well-established This century began with saw the birth of the communication age In this form, it is clear the verb saw cannot be the object of the preposition with.

Choice D offers three phrases in parallel form. Choice A is incorrect since the verb repairing is not parallel to the verb junk. In choice B , the construction have it junked is awkward. Further, it changes the original construction from active to passive. A Jurassic Park, written by Michael Crichton, and which was first printed in , B Jurassic Park, written by Michael Crichton and first printed in , C Jurassic Park, which was written by Michael Crichton, and which was first printed in , D Written by Michael Crichton and first printed in , Jurassic Park E Jurassic Park, which was written by Michael Crichton and first printed in , Choice A is incorrect since the verb written is not parallel to the construction which was … printed. Choice B is the correct answer since the sentence is concise and the verb written is parallel to the verb printed.

Choice D rambles. The introduction Written by … is too long. Note that which was need not be repeated for the sentence to be parallel. Choice A is incorrect because it uses the past perfect had chosen, which describes an event that has been completed before another event. But the sentence implies that teachers have and are continuing to return to the private sector. Hence, the present perfect tense should be used. Choice B is incorrect because it uses the present progressive tense having chosen, which describes an ongoing event. Although this is the case, it does not capture the fact that the event began in the past. Choice C is incorrect because it uses the simple past chose, which describes a past event.

But again, the sentence implies that the teachers are continuing to opt for the private sector. Choice D is the correct answer because it uses the present perfect have chosen to describe an event that occurred in the past and is continuing into the present. Choice E is incorrect because it leaves the thought in the sentence uncompleted. Choice C is the correct answer because it uses the past perfect had been to indicate that the homes were completely built before they were destroyed by the fires.

Choice D is incorrect because it uses the present perfect have been, which implies that the homes were destroyed before being built. Choice E is incorrect. Although dropping the phrase that were makes the sentence more concise, the past progressive were being implies that the homes were destroyed while being built. A have not signed a formal peace treaty; and both countries have been B did not signed a formal peace treaty; and both countries have been C have not signed a formal peace treaty; and both countries being D have not signed a formal peace treaty; and both countries are E are not signing a formal peace treaty; and both countries have been The sentence is grammatical as written.

The present perfect verb have … signed correctly indicates that they have not signed a peace treaty and are not on the verge of signing one. Further, the present perfect verb have been correctly indicates that in the past both countries have been reluctant to develop closer relations and are still reluctant. In choice B , the simple past did does not capture the fact that they did not sign a peace treaty immediately after the war and still have not signed one.

Choice C is very awkward, and the present progressive being does not capture the fact that the countries have been reluctant to thaw relations since after the war up through the present. In choice D , the present tense are leaves open the possibility that in the past the countries may have desired closer relations but now no longer do.

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