Bob Fosse Technique

Friday, April 8, 2022 1:11:13 PM

Bob Fosse Technique



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Jazz Technique 3- Fosse Walks (Twist step)

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Through studio practice and professional training you will develop as an authentic, multi-faceted performing artist, undertaking high level acting, dance and singing training within the unique environment of a leading European music conservatoire. Dance training will involve classes in ballet, tap and jazz, inclusive of the varying jazz styles street, commercial, lyrical and contemporary found in the modern industry. In your third year, you will work towards full scale Musical Theatre public performances, including an industry showcase where casting agents and industry insiders will be invited to watch you perform.

As a Leeds Conservatoire graduate, you will be fully prepared for a sustainable career in the Musical Theatre industry and beyond, with the skills and potential to work across various forms of theatre and screen work. Working with practitioners from Leeds Playhouse and conservatoire staff, you will study alongside active professionals and expert Musical Theatre educators who will train you to the highest, industry standard.

Our course is professionally accredited, which will allow graduates to gain full Equity and Spotlight membership upon graduation. Musical Theatre is taught in a bespoke building with state-of-the-art specialist facilities. Developed by industry leaders The Studio People, state-of-the-art dance and drama studio spaces sit alongside a seat purpose-built theatre. Graduates from Leeds Conservatoire have gone on to a wide variety of careers including Opera Singers, Musical Directors and more.

Find out further information in our Alumni section. Acting is central to this BA Hons Musical Theatre course and informs your training in both singing and dance, developing you in to a fully rounded professional musical theatre performer. Alongside this, a professional studies strand will develop your core business skills, including showreel creation, audition technique and more. This module looks to equip you with the core fundamentals of Actor training.

Themes developed in this strand will run central to your training in Voice, Dance and Performance modules. Specific Actor-Movement classes will allow you to discover the neutral body, and develop your ability to communicate effectively within the space as an ensemble member, whilst you will develop fundamental skills in Acting Through Song classes. In particular you will explore the full breadth of who you are as an artist, as well as developing techniques to work with others through spontaneity, play and improvisation.

In the second semester dramatic texts will be introduced to further explore these skills. You will receive core training in Ballet, Tap and Jazz dance styles, inclusive of Contemporary, Lyrical and Commercial as well as Broadway, in which you will develop your dance and movement skills. The emphasis will be on developing secure, fundamental dance techniques that are stylistically required for musical theatre. Dance 1: Fundamentals of Dance - Module Specification. Voice fundamentals incorporates the technical training of both spoken and sung voice. You will develop your vocal performance towards stylistically accurate performance of a range of repertoire.

A specialist tutor will oversee and direct your technical and musical development in weekly private singing lessons. Weekly Voice class will allow you develop freedom, colour and resonance within your spoken voice whilst regular Ensemble Singing classes will develop your musicianship, including your knowledge of music-theory and ability to sight read from a score.

Voice 1: Fundamentals of Voice - Module Specification. You will prepare, rehearse and present an in-programme performance that demonstrates the acquisition of your Acting and Performance skills. In this context you will practice and demonstrate what you have learned through engagement with external directors and contributors. You will explore the integration of your performance skills and collaborate whilst contributing creatively and personally to this artistic performance endeavour. Performance Project 1 - Module Specification. This module will introduce you to the various roles involved in the theatre with a series of short masterclass lectures delivered by people working in these various roles across the industry. These classes will act as inspiration as you begin your study if you are looking for wider application of the practical skills you develop as part of the programme.

Throughout the module you will be encouraged to identify your personal strengths and weaknesses in regards to your training and develop online portfolios of your progress throughout the year, including recordings and written accounts. These portfolios are intended to form the basis of your public online profiles in Year 2 and beyond. This module is designed to help you to develop research strategies and methodologies by looking at a range of influential practitioners across theatre and the development of theatre and performance training. These sessions are designed to reflect the scheme of work for Acting 1 — Fundamentals of Dramatic Techniques.

You will also further interrogate these theories through practical complementary sessions where you will explore practical exercises relating to the themes and content of the weekly lectures. This module is designed to further develop your capacity with regard to your knowledge and understanding of acting following on from your first year of training. The module is also designed to continue to embed professionally important aspects of self-reliance and self-discipline, as well as significant skills in the collaborative behaviours that are crucial in the context of co-creation, rehearsal and performance. This module is designed to build upon and deepen secure and consistent technique in dance and specialised physical skills. The module includes compulsory classes in Jazz, Ballet and Tap, whilst choreographic influences stretch to more individual practitioners, for example Jerome Robbins and Bob Fosse.

Choreography covered in Dance 2 should serve to best prepare you for Performance Project 2. At Level 5 Voice progresses from the exploration of your own physical and vocal potential to using the body and voice in the transformation process to character. Your training in semester one will stretch your abilities in terms of vocal quality, character and energy. You will continue to develop your technique and repertoire through class and private tuition.

Semester 1 is concerned with general skills acquisition, whereas semester 2 focuses on coaching in specific skills for the end of year project, bringing your training together in performance. In this module you will prepare, rehearse and present a medium scale in-house performance work that demonstrates performance skills acquired on the programme for an audience that is made up of students from other levels and programmes across the institution. In this context you will practice and demonstrate what you have learned through engagement with directors and other contributors. You will integrate your performance and collaborative skills whilst contributing creatively and personally to this artistic performance endeavour.

Performance Project 2 - Module Specification. This module builds on skills developed as part of Professional Studies 1 — Working in the Arts. You will be given opportunities to learn skills relating to developing your personal profile, as well as mounting your own work. As part of both, you will explore creative problem-solving techniques, as well as the formal aspects of pitch writing, budgeting, copyright, legal services, health and safety, risk assessment etc. As part of this module potential employers or funders for new work will be identified, giving you examples of companies you may wish to contact at Level 6 and beyond. This module is designed to introduce you to the context of contemporary and classical dramatic writing, acting, movement and dance and addresses core academic skills.

You will also further interrogate these theories through practical complementary sessions where students, in cohort groups, will explore practical exercises relating to the themes and content of the weekly lectures. You will also have a greater focus on audition technique throughout your final year of training in preparation for graduation. The module continues to embed professionally important aspects of self-reliance and self-discipline, as well as significant skills in the collaborative behaviours that are crucial in the context of the co-creation, rehearsal and performance. This module is designed to build upon and deepen secure and consistent technique in dance and specialised physical skills and extend existing knowledge and ability.

Now that decades of hostility are past, maybe it is time to reacknowledge the pervasive impact of this path-breaking development. On one side were tone composers who claimed the intellectual high ground, usually from secure posts in universities; on the other, composers who clung in various ways to tonal languages, cared about connecting with audiences and withstood the patronizing disdain of the tough-guy modernists in their midst.

Happily, the best young composers today feel entitled to borrow from anything and anyone, and more power to them. Talk to those young creators about the standoff between the Babbitts and the Coplands of 20th-century music, and they react as if you were trying to explain some archaic history, like the schism between the Brahms and Wagner wings of late 19th-century German music. Who cares? From what I can tell the tone technique is seldom adhered to strictly anymore. Still, if the application of the technique is loose, the aesthetic of tone music — its deliberately disorienting sound world, its burst-open harmonic palette, its leaping lines and every-which-way counterpoint, its gleeful avoidance of tonal centers — is very much alive among exciting composers of otherwise strikingly different styles.

For those unversed in music theory it may be worth explaining with a little more specificity what tone music is and how it came about. Tonality is a means of organizing pitch in accordance with the physics of sound. A fundamental tone — say, C in a C major scale — is central; the other pitches relate to it in a hierarchy of importance based on natural overtone relationships. Whatever happens, the music keeps returning to that fundamental tonal mooring. Variety, expression and development result when a composer plays with expectations and introduces ambiguity, letting the music drift to remote pitches and chords that are not part of the basic major or minor scale.

As music developed in the late 19th century, Wagner, Mahler, Debussy, Strauss and other path breakers pushed at the boundaries of that mooring and weakened the pull of the tonal center. Ten years into the 20th century the whole business was in crisis, Schoenberg argued. So he started composing in a harmonic language unhinged from tonality: atonality, it has been called. Yet Schoenberg revered order, form and tradition. So he took a conceptual leap. If all 12 pitches in the octave are to be used more or less equally, why not devise a system that ensured a kind of equality? Instead of the old tonal hierarchy, or his short-lived experiment in harmonic free-for-all, Schoenberg specified that the 12 pitches be put in an order, or row.

Once a pitch was sounded, it was not to be repeated until the entire row had unfolded. There were countless ways around this dictum, however, because Schoenberg adapted his technique so that the row could be transposed, gone through backward or upside down, broken into smaller units that were mixed and matched, and so on. Wiggle room was built in from the start. This description may make the technique sound like a rigid methodology, but Schoenberg found it liberating.

Besides, tonal music relies on patterns too. Whole spans of pieces by Mozart and Beethoven are generated through default patterns of pitches: arpeggios, scale passages, chords and the like. You are invited to take a vacation from tonality, to experience music without a tonal safety net. One branch took the systematizing principle radically further by placing rhythms and dynamics as well as pitches into predetermined series; hence the term serialism. Alas, there are many stories of gifted young composers who initially felt no choice but to adopt tone technique.

David Del Tredici, for one, eventually made the break and was in the vanguard of composers who rejected the dogma and reclaimed tonal languages. He emerged from that experience bitter. William Bolcom went through this experience too, though with fewer psychic scars, from what he has said. He was drawn to the music of Mr. Boulez and Luciano Berio as a young man, but also to the music of Darius Milhaud, with whom he studied, as well as a wide range of American vernacular music. In time Mr. Bolcom too shed what he considered an academic approach to composing and developed a vibrantly eclectic language, rich with allusion to American song, jazz, ragtime and rock. Still, he and Mr. Del Tredici are stronger and more precise composers today for having been through the rigors of tone composition.

Several giants explored tone technique as well: not only Stravinsky, whose move into the enemy camp shook up the world of modern music, but also Messiaen and Copland.

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